In praise of Bargain Hunt

Like many people, I am working from home at the moment. In normal circumstances, I work at home a day or two a week, and I have a routine. Everything stops at 12:15 for lunch and Bargain Hunt. Bargain Hunt is, in my view, a perfect TV show. It is difficult to classify. It is... Continue Reading →

Star Wars: a personal history

When The Force Awakens came out in 2015, I wrote a blog about how Star Wars had a strong sense of history, referencing previous times and films about them. After watching the new movie The Rise of Skywalker last Friday, I have been thinking about how the series has a history in a more personal... Continue Reading →

Doing research at the Royal Archives

I recently paid my first visit to the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle. Doing research there is a wonderful experience, so I thought it would be useful to blog about it here. I work on eighteenth-century British history and the Royal Archives is a key repository for this period, since it houses the records of... Continue Reading →

Horrible Histories: The Movie review

It’s the school holidays and I was looking for a way to entertain the children on a rainy morning, so we went to the local cinema to see Horrible Histories: The Movie. Since they graduated from CBeebies to CBBC, Horrible Histories has been a reliable favourite and, thanks to iPlayer and Netflix, we have watched... Continue Reading →

Peterloo today

Friday marks the bicentenary of the Peterloo Massacre. On 16 August 1819, a huge crowd of 60,000 men, women and children gathered in St Peter's Field in Manchester to listen to radical speakers and demand parliamentary reform. At this time, only around a tenth of adult males had the vote and many new industrial centres... Continue Reading →

‘Turns’ in eighteenth-century British history

Matthew McCormack gave this paper at the 'Eighteenth Century Now' conference at University College London on 26 April 2019. This conference was held to mark the 30th anniversary of the 'British History in the Long Eighteenth Century' seminar at the Institute of Historical Research, and was intended to reflect on the state of the field.... Continue Reading →

Shoes and conferences

Last Wednesday I travelled up to Liverpool to give a paper at conference on ‘Getting Dressed in the Eighteenth Century’. My paper was on shoes, thinking about the relationship between footwear and the body. I was going to discuss the impact that the body has upon shoes: shoes stretch to the shape of the foot... Continue Reading →

Research Seminars 2018-19

Here are the History contributions to the Education and Humanities Research Seminars at the University of Northampton. All papers are at Learning Hub LH017, Waterside Campus at 6pm. 25 October: Dr Toby Purser (UoN), 'The dog that didn’t bark: Sir John Sandys, social mobility and the community of knights and esquires in late medieval Hampshire'... Continue Reading →

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